Frank Stella
1936–2024

Introduction

Frank Philip Stella (May 12, 1936 – May 4, 2024) was an American painter, sculptor, and printmaker, noted for his work in the areas of minimalism and post-painterly abstraction. He lived and worked in New York City for much of his career before moving his studio to Rock Tavern, New York. Stella's work catalyzed the minimalist movement in the late 1950s. He took a reductionist approach to his art, saying he wanted to demonstrate that for him, every painting is "a flat surface with paint on it—nothing more", and disavowed conceptions of art as a means of expressing emotion. He won notice in the New York art world in 1959 when his four black pinstripe paintings were shown at the Museum of Modern Art. Stella was a recipient of the National Medal of Arts in 2009 and the Lifetime Achievement Award in Contemporary Sculpture by the International Sculpture Center in 2011.

Wikidata identifier

Q375268

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Information from Wikipedia, made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. Accessed May 14, 2024.

Introduction

Frank Stella earned his degree in history from Princeton University. He moved to New York in 1958, where he developed his artistic talents. He painted with intent to flatten surfaces and often chose square canvases. In the 1970s, Stella created "maximalist" paintings, which were paintings that involved relief and sculptural elements in stark contrast to the "minimalist" paintings of his early career. American painter.

Country of birth

United States

Roles

Artist, graphic artist, installation artist, mixed-media artist, painter, photographer, sculptor

ULAN identifier

500020533

Names

Frank Stella

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Information from the Getty Research Institute's Union List of Artist Names ® (ULAN), made available under the ODC Attribution License. Accessed April 26, 2024.